Simple and natural solutions that promote sleep

Getting enough sleep is extremely important for health. Sleep helps your body and brain function properly. A good night’s sleep can help improve your learning, memory, decision-making, and even creativity. Additionally, insufficient sleep has been linked to a higher risk of conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Despite this, the quality and quantity of sleep have never been lower, and more and more people are suffering from poor sleep. Remember that good sleep often starts with good sleep practices and habits. However, for some this is not enough.

1. Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone your body produces naturally that signals your brain that it’s time to sleep. The time of day influences the cycle of production and release of this hormone: the level of melatonin naturally increases in the evening and decreases in the morning. This is why melatonin supplements have become a popular sleep aid, especially in cases where the melatonin cycle is disrupted, such as jet lag.

Additionally, several studies indicate that melatonin improves the quality and duration of sleep during the day. This is especially beneficial for people whose schedules require them to sleep during the day, such as shift workers. Additionally, melatonin may improve overall sleep quality in people with sleep disorders. Specifically, melatonin appears to reduce the time it takes for people to fall asleep (known as sleep latency) and increase total sleep time.

2. Valerian root

Valerian is a plant native to Asia and Europe. Its root is commonly used as a natural treatment for symptoms of anxiety, depression, and menopause.

Valerian root is also one of the most widely used herbal sleep supplements in Europe. Short-term intake of valerian root is safe for adults, with minor and infrequent side effects. Valerian root is a popular supplement that can improve sleep quality and symptoms of sleep disorders.

3. Magnesium

Magnesium is a mineral involved in hundreds of processes in the human body, and is important for brain function and heart health. Additionally, magnesium can help calm the mind and body, making it easier to fall asleep. Studies show that the relaxing effect of magnesium may be partly due to its ability to regulate melatonin production. Magnesium is known to relax muscles and induce sleep. Magnesium also appears to increase levels of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), a brain messenger with calming effects. Increasing your magnesium intake by taking supplements can help you optimize the quality and quantity of your sleep.

4. Lavender

Lavender is found on almost all continents. It produces purple flowers which, when dried, have many household uses. Additionally, the soothing scent of lavender is believed to promote sleep. In fact, several studies show that simply smelling lavender oil shortly before sleep may be enough to improve sleep quality. This effect appears to be particularly strong in people with mild insomnia, especially women and young people.

5. Passionflower

Passionflower, also known as Passiflora incarnata, is a popular herbal remedy for insomnia. Passionflower species linked to improved sleep are native to North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. The effects of passionflower on sleep have been shown in animal studies. However, its effects in humans appear to be dependent on the form consumed.

In a recent study of people with insomnia, those who took passionflower extract over a period of two weeks saw significant improvements in some sleep parameters compared to a placebo group.

These parameters were as follows

– total sleep time


– sleep efficiency, or the percentage of time spent sleeping versus that spent lying awake in bed

– the wake-up time after the start of sleep

6. Glycine

Glycine is an amino acid that plays an important role in the nervous system. Studies show that it can also help improve sleep. It’s not clear exactly how it works, but glycine is thought to work in part by lowering body temperature at bedtime, signaling that it’s time to sleep.

In one study conducted in 2006, participants with poor sleep consumed 3 grams of glycine or a placebo immediately before bedtime.

Those in the glycine group reported feeling less tired the next morning. They also said that their alertness, alertness, and mental clarity were higher the next morning. You can buy glycine in pill or powder form to dilute in water. A daily intake of 0.8 grams/kg body weight seems safe, but more studies are needed. Many participants in sleep studies only took 3 grams per day.

You can also increase your glycine intake by eating foods high in this nutrient, including:

– animal products such as bone broth, meat, eggs, poultry and fish

– beans

– spinach

– kale

– cabbage

7-9. Other possible supplements

There are many other sleep-promoting food supplements on the market. However, not all of them are backed by solid scientific research.

The list below outlines a few additional supplements that may benefit sleep but require further scientific study.

– Tryptophan. One study reports that doses as low as one gram per day of this essential amino acid can help improve sleep quality. This dosage can also help you fall asleep faster.

– Ginkgo biloba. According to older studies, the consumption of approximately 240 mg of this natural plant 30 at 60 minutes before bedtime can help reduce stress, improve relaxation and promote sleep.

– L-theanine. Consuming a daily supplement containing up to 240 mg of this amino acid may help improve sleep and relaxation. Animal studies suggest it may be more effective when combined with GABA.

Presse Santé strives to transmit health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO CASE, the information given can not replace the advice of a health professional.

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